OST is closed for business but its spirit survives on my blog.

Do we need the same creed to work together? I don't think so...

Do we need the same creed to work together? I don't think so...

I don’t think we need to be so concerned that all of our doctrines match up, as grifgraf seems to be implying. I think an example that nicely illustrates my view comes from the name of our site; "open-source" software. There are actually two distinct ways to view the idea of freely-availiable source code. "Open-source" is only one way, another way is to view it as "free software." The "free software" movement, and the "open-source" movement differ fundamentally in their philosophies. As I understand it anyway, an "open-source" developer simply uses freely-availiable source code as a better software development model, whereas a "free software" developer feels a strong fundamental freedom is being expressed by developing software in an open matter, and that it is about more than just the software. So, these two camps are very different in their core beliefs. The GNU website, however, characterizes the interactions between these two "factions" as being friendlier and more productive than you might think. "The relationship between the Free Software movement and the Open Source movement is…[that w]e disagree on the basic principles, but agree more or less on the practical recommendations. So we can and do work together on many specific projects." (http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-software-for-freedom.html) I wonder if we can view the relationship of the emerging church to the "modern" churches in this way, or even the relationships between individual members of the emerging church. We may disagree on things as fundamental as the content of the creed, yet we can still work together in the world, and be in common mission. We don’t necessarily need orthodoxy (right belief) to produce orthopraxy (right practice).
My (tentative) beliefs By: Andrew (39 replies) 20 February, 2004 - 20:19